Lone Pine, California

The Alabama Hills

The Alabama Hills is a National Recreation Area managed by the BLM just north of Lone Pine, California. It is a land of potato shaped boulders and myriad arches. Over 400 movies and TV shows have been shot in the Alabama Hills. Mount Whitney is just to the west of Alabama Hills and towers almost 10,000 feet above the hills. Many of the Alabama Hills arches frame Mount Whitney and Lone Pine Peak, also to the west.

Mobius Arch is the most famous of the Alabama Hills arches. The arch is best at sunrise when its better side is lit and it frames the alpenglow on Mount Whitney and Lone Pine Peak. You are likely to see other photographers at Mobius as well, even at sunrise, and the best area for shooting is small, so get there early, especially on weekends. Getting to Mobius Arch requires a short .25 mile hike over an easy trail. Lathe arch is just to the southwest of Mobius Arch and is best at sunrise as well.

Other photogenic arches within Alabama Hills include the Eye of Alabama, Boot and Cyclops Arch, Hitching Post Arch, and Space Case Arch. The Eye of Alabama frames Lone Pine Peak and Mount Whitney when shot from its back side. To access the rear (east side) of the arch hike to its front right side (as seen by you) and turn east. Just after you turn there is an easy scramble up to the arch via a crack. Space Case Arch can be accessed via a short off-tail hike beginning at either the Mobius Arch trail or at the Eye of Alabama trailhead. About twenty feet north from Space Case arch you'll find Baseball Bat arch. It looks more like a corn dog to me. While you can scramble up to Baseball Bat your photos of it won't get any better.

There are over 400 other arches in the Alabama Hills, of which 300 have been documented by Eugene Carsey. His website http://www.eugenecarsey.com/camp/alabamahills/arches2.htm contains GPS coordinates, images, and travel directions for these 300 arches. Eugene's website is often down; if it is search for a recent copy of his website on the internet archive at https://archive.org/web/ . Another great source of information is the book "Arches of the Alabama Hills" by Orlyn Fordham. It contains the GPS coordinates and good photos of 72 arches within the Alabama Hills National Recreation Area.

When to Go

The high desert of Lone Pine is best visited during the spring or fall though winters are reasonable as well with daytime highs in the mid-fifties. Summers are hot and crowded and should generally be avoided unless you are planning to climb Mount Whitney. For me the best time of the year to visit is during November when the cottonwood trees are changing color, the yellow of the trees contrasts nicely with the darkly colored boulders and arches.

Most visitors combine trips to the Alabama Hills with:

  • Climbing Mount Whitney - best May to October
  • Death Valley - best October to April
  • Eastern Sierras Fall Color including Mono Lake, Bodie, Bristlecone Pines, June Lake, Convict Lake, Bishop, Mammoth Lakes, etc. - Best late September to mid-November
  • As a stopover driving between southern California and the Mammoth Lakes ski resorts - winter
  • Cerro Gordo Ghost Town - good anytime when the road is open
  • Trona Pinnacles - best at sunset or night

Climate data for Lone Pine can be found at here.

Where to Stay

The town of Lone Pine is less than five minutes away from the Alabama Hills and has good services with many motels and restaurants. Lone Pine is very camper friendly. The BLM operates the Tuttle Creek Campground which costs $8 per night. Pit Toilets, fire rings, and picnic tables area available. Water is available March to October. No reservations. A great alternative is dispersed camping available within the Alabama Hills. Camping is free, 14 day limit, first come first served. Campsites are not marked but as you drive the many roads with the Alabama Hills you will find a great many suitable sites, some of which are big enough for large RVs. Sites are scenic and private. The downside - no water, tables, or toilets. Quiet hours are 10PM to 6AM.


Cerro Gordo Ghost Town

The Cerro Gordo Mines form the basis of a small ghost town about 45 minutes from Lone Pine. There are several largely intact buildings remaining, of which the American Hotel is the most photogenic, especially the inside. Although the hotel is currently being renovated you may be able to gain access to the interior. Prior to visiting Cerro Gordo call Robert Desmarais, the property manager, at 760 876-5030 and ask about road conditions.

Cerro Gordo ghost town is at 8,500 feet in elevation and is accessed via Cerro Gordo Road. This is a steep packed dirt road. A 2WD vehicle is normally sufficient, except following a rain or in the winter after a snow. While the road is not difficult to drive, it is steep, narrow, and there are drop-offs. Some will be uncomfortable driving it. Cerro Gordo Road continues past the ghost town to Saline Valley Road. 4WD low is required to continue on to Saline Valley as the road becomes very rocky with wash-outs.

To get to Cerro Gordo from Lone Pine drive south on US 395 / Main Street to the intersection with CA 136. Turn left at the intersection and drive 13.0 miles (just past the town of Keeler) to Cerro Gordo Road. Turn left and drive 7.7 miles on Cerro Gordo Road to the ghost town.

Cerro Gordo is privately owned and only gets a few visitors per day. It is open every day from 9AM to 4PM in the winter months, and from 9AM to 5PM when daylight savings time is in effect. Admission is $15 per person and a liability waiver form must be signed. The website cerrogordomines.com contains more information about access and admission tickets can be purchased. Cerro Gordo was sold in late 2018 but as of this writing (March, 2020) remains open to the public. As of March 2020 you can also pay the admission fee when you get to Cerro Gordo.

The interior of the American Hotel is spectacular and by itself is worth the trip. Be sure to photograph the bar and the painting by Sylvia Winslow. Watch for glare on the painting. The poker room is also a good subject, my rushed image does not do it justice. You'll need an ultra-wide angle to capture it. The interiors of the Assay Office and the museum are also worth shooting. The bunkhouse has been renovated and can be skipped. The remains of the Ice House frame dry Owens Lake in the far distance.


The Trona Pinnacles

The Trona Pinnacles are about 90 minutes south of Lone Pine. They are an excellent destination for night photography. From late February through early August you can capture the full span of the Milky Way over the Pinnacles using an ultra-wide lens and a panorama head. Shoot a composite of two images during the moon's 3rd quarter. For the first image the moon, setting to the west, will light up the west facing pinnacles. Shoot the second image of the Milky Way after the moon has set and combine both in Photoshop. Alternatively you can try to light paint the pinnacles while the Milky Way is up, this is difficult when shooting a panorama.

Milky Way Center first visible at
Date Time Visible Elevation
3/1 2:26 AM
4/1 1:23 AM
5/1 11:25PM
6/1 9:46PM 3.3°
7/1 9:57PM 19.7°
8/1 9:32PM 25.3°

The pinnacles are also a good destination at sunset when there are good clouds present. To get to the Trona Pinnacles from Lone Pine take US395 70 miles south to exit 97 - California 178 and turn left. Continue on 178 4.5 miles to Jacks Ranch Road and turn right. Take Jacks Ranch Road 2 miles and turn left onto Ridgecrest Blvd. Continue of Ridgecrest Blvd / CA 178 for 19.7 miles and turn right onto Pinnacle Road. Follow Pinnacle Road for six miles to the main parking area. Good lodging is available in Ridgecrest (population 29,000), and dispersed camping is available at the Pinnacles. Late February through early June is the best time to visit the Pinnacles as temperatures are mostly pleasant and the full arc of the Milky Way will be visible.


Map of the Lone Pine Area



The Palouse

To view the map in Google Maps please click anywhere on the map above.

USGS 24K Topo Maps

Alabama Hills is covered by the Lone Pine, Manzanaro, Mount Langley, and Union Wash maps. A merge of these four maps is available below. The Lone Pine GeoTiff on both Topoquest and libremap.org is corrupt so I downloaded the GeoPdf from the USGS National Map Server and converted it to a GeoTiff. All four maps above and the merge map can be downloaded in a variety of formats by clicking or right clicking below.

Alabama Hills Index Map

Alabama Hills Index Map



Mount Whitney at Dawn

Mount Whitney at Dawn

Lone Pine Peak at Dawn

Lone Pine Peak at Dawn

Mobius_Arch framing Lone Pine Peak and Mount Whitney

Mobius Arch at Sunrise

Lathe Archin the Alabama Hills

Lathe Arch at Dawn

Alabama Hills Cottonwood Tree

Alabama Hills Fall Color

Cerro Gordo Hotel Bar

Cerro Gordo Hotel Bar

The American Hotel Poker Room

The Poker Room in the American Hotel

24K Topographic maps covering the Alabama Hills National Recreation Area

Alabama Hills Index Map

Alabama Hills Cottonwood Tree

Alabama Hills Fall Color

Mobius_Arch framing Lone Pine Peak and Mount Whitney

Mobius Arch at Sunrise

Lathe Arch

Lathe Arch at Dawn

Heart Arch

Heart Arch Telephoto

Eye of Alabama Arch

Eye of Alabama

Eye of Alabama framing Lone Pine Peak

Eye of Alabama framing Lone Pine Peak

Space Case Arch with Baseball Bat Arch

Space Case Arch

Hitching Post Arch

Hitching Post Arch

Lone Pine Peak at Dawn

Lone Pine Peak at Dawn

Mount Whitney at Dawn

Mount Whitney at Dawn

The Milky Way over the Trona Pinnacles

The Milky Way over the Trona Pinnacles

Cerro Gordo Hotel Bar

Cerro Gordo Hotel Bar

Bottles in the Cerro Gordo Assay House

The Cerro Gordo Assay House

Cerro Gordo Ice House framing Owens Lake

Owen's Lake Framed